Archive for August, 2009

Song of Songs 2:8-13

August 31, 2009

Preparing for today’s sermon, I made an exciting discovery: there is such a thing as evolution. What is more, it is happening within the church. Rather than telling you what is evolving, though; let me share with you my process of discovery. Then let’s see if some of us don’t leave here this morning, powdered all over with a new pollen of hope. (more…)

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Joshua 24:1-2a, 14-18; Ephesians 6:10-20; John 6:56-69

August 23, 2009

The readings from Joshua and John share a common setting. In both, people are being tested. Whom will they follow? Joshua puts the choice to the people of Israel bluntly, saying, “Choose this day whom you will serve.” Jesus does not demand a choice in so many words, but his teaching has reached a point where his disciples can no longer follow with their rational minds. What should they do? Go ahead with Jesus on faith, or leave him and turn back to familiar ground? This morning I want to focus on the issue of testing, because I want to clear up a common misunderstanding in the Lord’s Prayer; that is, the final supplication which says, “Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” (more…)

Proverbs 9:1-6; John 6:51-58

August 16, 2009

In a college psychology class our professor once quipped, “We all know the mind and the body are one. The question is, which one?” I’m recalling this humorous quip now, because it leads into the topic of today’s sermon. That is, “How does the Bible work?” And, “How can I make it work for me?” (more…)

John 6:24-35

August 2, 2009

If we were part of this group that is peppering Jesus with questions, we could be pardoned if we felt frustration. Does he never answer a question straight? We ask about time: “When did you come here?” He replies, in effect, “You are here for the wrong reason.” Then we ask, “What shall we do?” Jesus replies enigmatically, “Believe.” Next, we ask for a sign. He replies with a little dissertation on bread. Finally, we ask for bread; and he replies, “I am the bread.” If I read this passage out of a psychology textbook, you would say, “Right! That must be the chapter on dysfunctional communication.” (more…)